So long Jeff Teague, whoever you were

I don't know, it's all a mystery to me, too, Jeff. (Getty Images)

I don’t know, it’s all a mystery to me, too, Jeff. (Getty Images)

The best Hawks point guards, history will show, came with catchy nicknames to match their nifty games.

Doc (Glenn) Rivers ran the show during the other golden – really more of a bronze – age of Hawks basketball. And who knew troubled Mookie Blaylock had a real name? The Internet says it was Daron.

Jeff Teague had no such nom de hoops, nor did he really earn one. After seven seasons with the Hawks, the overriding impression of Teague was, despite his obvious talents and even an All-Star season, more that of an enigma than a figure worthy of a colorful name accessory.

Reflective of that was how blithely he was dismissed when traded this week to Indiana. The fan reaction seemed muted, even by Hawks standards. And, with one season left on his contract, his value translated to no better than a middling first-round draft pick that never got packaged for anything better come Thursday’s harvest.

Goodbye just plain Jeff, we hardly knew ye.

Here’s how Teague, the floor leader during the team’s most successful season (2014-15), compared with other bygone and noted Atlanta Hawks point guards:

Teague (2009-16) – 518 games, 12.1 points per game, 5.2 assists per game, 1.2 steals per game.

Doc Rivers (1983-91) – 568 games, 13.0 ppg, 6.8 apg, 2.1 spg.

Mookie Blaylock (1992-99) – 518 games, 14.9 ppg, 7.3 apg, 2.6 spg.

Jason Terry (1999-2004) – 403 games, 16.2 ppg, 5.5 apg, 1.5 spg.

So, no, Teague, for all the quickness and the guile he surely possessed, did not carve a particularly distinctive niche in the line of Hawks point guards. Much due to an assertiveness that seemed to have an off-on switch (think the dying seconds of a close game, Teague with the ball at the top of the key, and, then … nothing). Too infrequently did the on-court personality betray the will to win that surely resided inside him.

Now, then, hand the keys over to Dennis Schroder. He seems to have the edge that Teague lacked, while not always demonstrating the ability to harness it. Splicing the two players would have been such a perfect solution, but sadly we lack the technology.

Better make sure the insurance is paid up and you buckle up. The ride just got a little wilder.

Reader Comments 0

24 comments
ciachef95
ciachef95

I worry about Dennis' immaturity.  He has  a good shot and plays aggressively, but can he control himself and be a consistent, unselfish leader?

B_D
B_D

There were too many times when Dennis was in, that the team was in disarray and Jeff came back in, settled everyone down and ran the team.  While I will admit that Dennis has a better shot and is more confident.  Jeff did not just launch shots up with out making sure everyone was covered.  When people could not make shots, there were several games where he just took over.  That was where "Teague Time" came into being and it was a cover that he "earned".  I like Doc, Mookie and Jason also, but none of them were as quick as Jeff or broke as many ankles as I have seen him do over the last several years.  We will miss him.  Dennis has talent but too often plays out of control.  If he can harness that he can be a good pro.  But that is a big if.  Time will tell.  In the meantime, I wish Jeff well and hope he does well in Indiana.


DaltonbywayofBickley
DaltonbywayofBickley

I think so far this off season the Hawks have not improved. At best a wash, more likely a small step back.

POV1948
POV1948

Schroder has the edge as well as obvious (at times) talent but there's a scary lack of discipline and floor awareness. Per the fashionable phrase that pays, in key situations he seems low on basketball IQ. Turning him into a consistently effective PG could be Bud's make or break challenge.

Joshua Carnes
Joshua Carnes

It was time he had his chance to be a great player but he held the ball as the clock hit zero better off with Dennis he will drive the ball and won't take no for a answer

Tony Wall
Tony Wall

I guess the past couple of seasons when he was consistently called M-V-Teague and Teague Time was a thing because he was actually good late in big games was lost on the moronic writer of this article. GTFO

Kai Uchimura
Kai Uchimura

What do you mean "hardly knew ye"? He's been here since 2009, disrespectful much?

Michael S. Griffin
Michael S. Griffin

That's why Atlanta sports is terrible. He was certainly one of the better point guards in the league, and the reason Atlanta consistently made the playoffs, but the AJC hardly knew him? Horrible newspaper in this instance.

Christen Brown
Christen Brown

Get new writers that are actually born within the state of Georgia

L Renee Harris
L Renee Harris

I agree. This read more like something from one of those trashy gossip magazines. It's as if the Ajc writers are a bunch of high school mean girls all.grown up.

Tobias10
Tobias10

I thought Teague was pretty dang solid. The organization never gave this squad the other necessary pieces to be complete. Don't blame Jeff.

KBP
KBP

Dennis can get into the lane with the best of them and his shot has improved but can he run a team?

TrueFan1
TrueFan1

the amount of times he just plain missed the layup was astronomical....

moboman
moboman

dont forget Fast Eddie.  I go with Teague over Doc, and Terry.